Help is available for Queenslanders affected by domestic and family violence

To help slow the spread of COVID-19, Queenslanders are spending more time at home – but home isn’t always a safe place.

Everyone deserves to feel safe – domestic and family violence is never acceptable.

Help and support is available.

Who are you looking for support for?

Help and support is available

Home might not feel like the safest place to be right now.

If you are feeling unsafe and scared, it’s important to know that is not okay and help is available.

Reach out and talk with someone you trust, like a grandparent or teacher.

You can also find help via Kids Helpline.

If you would like to talk to someone who can help, call Kids Helpline on 1800 55 1800 any time, for any reason.

If it’s an emergency and you need help straight away, call Triple Zero (000) and ask for Police.

If making a phone call doesn’t feel safe for you, contact the Police online.

Help and support is available

If you think you may be experiencing or using domestic and family violence, help and support is available. We urge you to reach out and seek help.

DVConnect Womensline

1800 811 811 (24/7)

Free, confidential crisis support, advice and referrals for all people identifying as female—regardless of ethnicity, religion, age, or disability—experiencing or using domestic and family violence.

Visit DVConnect Womensline

DVConnect Mensline

1800 600 636 (9am to midnight, 7 days)

Free, confidential crisis support, advice and referrals for all people identifying as male—regardless of ethnicity, religion, age, or disability—experiencing or using domestic and family violence.

Visit DVConnect Mensline

Police

If you are in immediate danger, call Triple Zero (000) and ask for Police.

If making a phone call isn’t a safe option for you, contact the Police online.

Visit Police

Sexual Assault Helpline

1800 010 120 (7.30am to 11.30pm, 7 days)

Telephone support and counselling for any Queenslander—regardless of age, gender, religion, ethnicity or disability—who has or thinks they may have been sexually assaulted or abused; or for those who are concerned someone they care about might have been assaulted or abused.

Visit Queensland Sexual Assault Helpline

Regional & specialist services

Use the Online service finder to locate domestic and family violence support services in your region.

Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council
(07) 3328 8500

Queensland Indigenous Family Violence Legal Services
1800 887 700
(8.30am to 5pm Monday to Friday)

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Legal Service
1800 012 255
(24/7)

Alcohol and Drug Information Service

1800 177 833 (24/7)

Alcohol and drug use can be a contributing factor to domestic and family violence. It does not excuse domestic and family violence. Reach out for support if you have alcohol and other drug concerns.

Visit Alcohol and Drug Information Service

Find out more about support services that are available to you.

You can make a difference

All Queenslanders have a responsibility to address domestic and family violence. We all need to remain alert and aware of the safety of others.

Keep in touch with your friends, family and work colleagues. If someone you know becomes distant and removed – we urge you to reach out to them. It is important to stay connected.

If you are concerned that someone you know may be experiencing domestic and family violence, reach out and offer your support.

You can also:

What is domestic and family violence?

Domestic and family violence happens when one person in a relationship uses abuse or violence to maintain power and control over the other person.

Abuse is not only physical – it can be emotional, sexual, financial, social, spiritual, verbal, psychological, or technology-based.

It is controlling or threatening behaviour that causes the person being abused to be fearful.

Find out more about domestic and family violence and learn to recognise the signs.

Types of abuse

Domestic and family violence is not about conflict, it is about power and control. It is behaviour that makes someone feel unsafe and threatened, and it is never acceptable.

Domestic and family violence includes many types of abuse.

This is the form of violence many of us are most familiar with and involves causing or threatening physical harm to control another person. For example:

  • slapping, kicking, punching,
  • choking or causing other kinds of injury
  • punching holes in walls or breaking furniture
  • physically restricting a person’s movement e.g. locking someone in a room or a house
  • threatening to harm children, other loved ones or pets.

Verbal abuse can include:

  • yelling, shouting or swearing
  • using words to intimidate or cause fear
  • frequently accusing someone of having affairs
  • constant criticism and put downs.

Emotional abuse is not always easy to identify, but it can lower self-esteem and confidence, impacting on a person’s mental health and wellbeing. Examples are:

  • constant criticism and name calling
  • intentionally embarrassing someone
  • telling the person what to wear or criticising their looks
  • threatening to commit suicide or self-harm to intimidate and control.

Social abuse can start with subtle, controlling behaviours that can end in complete isolation from friends, family and support networks. For example:

  • monitoring phones and devices without permission
  • controlling which friends and family members someone has contact with
  • continuously criticising the person’s friends and family
  • purposefully humiliating the person in public or in front of other people.

Financial abuse can start with subtle, controlling behaviours and can end in complete control over a person’s personal finances. For example:

  • getting angry about the person spending money
  • taking a person’s pay or restricting their access to joint bank accounts
  • refusing to pay for necessary items such as food and medicine
  • stopping the person from working.

Psychological abuse can affect a person’s inner thoughts and feelings as well as exerting control over their life. Examples are:

  • controlling their access to medications
  • frequent abusive text messages or demanding phone calls
  • constantly keeping check on where the person is and what they are doing
  • threatening to disclose a person’s sexual orientation against their wishes.

Sexual abuse can include:

  • forcing or coercing a person to have sex or engage in sexual acts
  • unwanted exposure to pornography
  • deliberately causing pain during sex
  • using sexually degrading insults.

Technology-based abuse can include:

  • constantly messaging or calling a person
  • checking their phone and other devices without permission
  • tracking their movements using technology e.g. ‘find my iPhone’ or other tracking apps
  • posting sexually explicit images or videos online without permission.

Spiritual abuse can include:

  • forcing someone to attend religious activities
  • stopping the person from taking part in their religious or cultural practices
  • misusing spiritual or religious beliefs and practices to justify abuse and violence.

Learn more about the signs of domestic and family violence.

Help and support is available

If you think you may be experiencing or using domestic and family violence, help and support is available. We urge you to reach out and seek help.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander resources and translated resources are also available.

DVConnect Womensline

1800 811 811 (24/7)

Free, confidential crisis support, advice and referrals for all people identifying as female—regardless of ethnicity, religion, age, or disability—experiencing or using domestic and family violence.

Visit DVConnect Womensline

DVConnect Mensline

1800 600 636 (9am to midnight, 7 days)

Free, confidential crisis support, advice and referrals for all people identifying as male—regardless of ethnicity, religion, age, or disability—experiencing or using domestic and family violence.

Visit DVConnect Mensline

Police

If you are in immediate danger, call Triple Zero (000) and ask for Police.

If making a phone call isn’t a safe option for you, contact the Police online.

Visit Police

Kids Helpline

1800 55 1800 (24/7)

Help is available anytime, for any reason.

If you can’t get to a phone or prefer to chat online, you can connect one-on-one with a Kids Helpline counsellor through webchat.

Visit Kids Helpline

Sexual Assault Helpline

1800 010 120 (7.30am to 11.30pm, 7 days)

Telephone support and counselling for any Queenslander—regardless of age, gender, religion, ethnicity or disability—who has or thinks they may have been sexually assaulted or abused; or for those who are concerned someone they care about might have been assaulted or abused.

Visit Queensland Sexual Assault Helpline

Regional & specialist services

Use the Online service finder to locate domestic and family violence support services in your region.

Queensland Aboriginal and Islander Health Council
(07) 3328 8500

Queensland Indigenous Family Violence Legal Services
1800 887 700
(8.30am to 5pm Monday to Friday)

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander Legal Service
1800 012 255
(24/7)

Alcohol and Drug Information Service

1800 177 833 (24/7)

Alcohol and drug use can be a contributing factor to domestic and family violence. It does not excuse domestic and family violence. Reach out for support if you have alcohol and other drug concerns.

Visit Alcohol and Drug Information Service

Do you use domestic and family violence in your relationship?

Using violence and other forms of abuse is a choice. Individuals are responsible for their own behaviour and how they choose to react to stress factors. It takes courage to ask for help to change your behaviour.

Have there been times when you have:

  • made demands and threats?
  • used any form or coercion or physical abuse?
  • noticed your behaviour affecting your partner or someone at home?
  • noticed you have used these behaviours before?

Anger is an emotion. Abuse or violence is a behaviour to control a situation or person.

People can get angry without being abusive.

If the person you love or care for says they are afraid as a result of your words or actions, then believe them.

Arguments and disagreements are normal and both people should feel they have the right to, and can, influence the direction of the argument.

Abusive behaviour is controlling, and leaves one person feeling less equal than another, afraid and controlled.

No one deserves to be abused – there is no excuse for using domestic and family violence.

Help is available if you want to stop using violence and abuse.

Action to end domestic and family violence

We are all responsible for addressing domestic and family violence.

Download and share the campaign resources in your workplace or local community group.

Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander resources and translated resources are also available to download.

Find out more about what the Queensland Government is doing to end domestic and family violence in Queensland and find out how you can help to end domestic and family violence in your workplace or local community.